Fall Tips from the Athletic Training Room

petri dishWhat is MRSA?

Staphylococcus aureus:

  • Otherwise known as staph.
  • Bacteria commonly found on the skin and in the nose of 25-35% of healthy people.
  • Usually does not cause illness or infections.
  • Instead the person is known as a staph carrier.

Illness or infections occur when:

  • Bacteria gets into the body through cuts, abrasions, wounds, or surgical incisions.
  • Infections can look like pimples, pustules, or boils.
  • Appearance of the infection can be red, swollen, and painful.
  • There can be an increase in skin temperature around the site of infections and a possibility of pus or other drainage coming from the infection.
  • Not properly referred or taken care of, a more serious infection can cause pneumonia, a bloodstream infection, surgical wound infections or infection of the bones and/or joints.
  • Be careful, some pustules or pimples can be confused with insect bites, a previous abrasion or a “common” infection.

Treatment:

  • Usually with antibiotics.
  • However in some cases, certain strands of staph especially MRSA are resistant to many antibiotics.
  • MRSA, otherwise known as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus, is a type of staph that is resistant to antibiotics called beta-lactams, which include methicillin, penicillin and amoxicillin.

Infections caused by MRSA:

  • Cause serious damage if not properly treated.
  • If the signs and symptoms above continue or get worse, getting to your primary care physician is of utmost importance.
  • Can only be identified through microbial testing, which occurs when the doctor takes a sample or specimen of the infection and submits it to a laboratory.
  • Testing the sample by using various antibiotics to see if the bacteria are resistant or sensitive to those antibiotics.
  • MRSA is treated with the use of one of the following drugs, vancomycin or teicoplanin. Both are administered by either infusion or injection.

Whom does MRSA affect?

  • Patients in the hospital.
  • Becoming more common in the community setting especially in health clubs, athletes and the physically active.
  • People with a deficiency in their immune system (low white cell count) or who are already ill can also be infected.

How is it Spread?

  • Close skin-skin contact.
  • Openings in the skin (cuts, abrasions, etc.).
  • Contaminated items or surfaces.
  • Crowded living conditions.
  • Poor hygiene.

Prevention:

  • Keep wounds covered with clean, dry bandage.
  • Clean hands after changing bandage.
  • Do Not share towels, clothing, or razors.
  • Keep barrier b/w skin and shared equipment.
  • Wiping surfaces of equipment before and after use.
Message From Towson Sports Medicine

Towson Sports Medicine continues to address physical rehabilitation
of those in need.

We do this by restricting the number of patients in our clinics and strictly abiding by all CDC recommendations.

We are also able to offer remote services by means of phone calls and/or video conferencing.  The offering of these services is dependent on your insurance. 

Do not hesitate to call if you have any questions or would like to have your therapy needs addressed by one of our therapists at any of our locations.

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